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  • dandjcr
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30 Oct 2012 13:45
dandjcr created the topic:Auxiliary Battery

Auxiliary Battery

Category: April 2012

Forum Home > OKA Maintenance > Auxiliary Battery

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Which of the two batteries - left or right - is the auxiliary battery ie the one that gets charged last.
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Tony

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April 2, 2012 at 7:18 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
On our Oka the starter battery is on the driver's side, but the wiring can easily be changed around on the back of the dual battery switch/solenoid, so it's worth checking.
You can check by disconnecting a battery. With the dual battery switch off/key removed, if the dashboard lights and relays still turn on with the ignition switch, it's the starter battery that you disconnected since they are powered from the auxiliary battery.
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David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

April 2, 2012 at 7:33 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Pete Fox
Member
Posts: 140
Tony
In my Oka LT 266, the starting battery is on the passenger side,
I always thought that the reason was that it was the closest one to the starter motor.
Pete
--
Peter Fox

OKA 266 Multi-cab.

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April 2, 2012 at 8:28 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Peter & Sandra James Oka 374
Member
Posts: 412
374 has the aux on the passengers side and the starting battery on the drivers side.
Peter the starter motor is on the drivers side on 374 isn't yours the same?
Also on 374 the battery switch disconnects all power to the vehicle, nothing to do with the auxilary battery at all, charging for the auxilary is via a Redarc VSR. All the auxilary battery provides power for is the winch and air compressor , it was that way when I bought it.
--
Oka 374 LT Van

April 2, 2012 at 9:01 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Ah well, that'll teach me to be too lazy to check it out for myself. Just that it got dark a bit earlier than before - 1 hour earlier actually - and Im going to Taree very very early tomorrow and wanted to get some cable to connect from the auxiliary battery to the DC-DC charger that charges the house batteries. As a poor pensioner, I didn't want to get a couple of metres of extra cable if it wasn't necessary.
At least you have given me an easy way to check which is which.
Thanks Peter. I'd say mine might be wired up like David's since everything works normally with the red switch in the off position and only needs to be turned on to connect the two batteries together if one gets flattened. Maybe yours is a special defence force spec.
--
Tony

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April 2, 2012 at 9:41 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hank Onthewater
Member
Posts: 77
Sofar we have (in this thread) two starter batteries on the driver's side and one on the passenger side. I will balance things up here: mine is on the passenger's side. All the wiring looked original when I bought it, and all equipment was run from the starter battery.
The isolation switch (behind the driver's seat) just put the 2nd (aux) battery in parallel.
I changed this by adding a (Sterling) VSR and by running all additional equipment from the aux battery.
Hank
April 3, 2012 at 5:18 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
I think the answer is that if the Oka had only one battery originally, it was located on the LHS (passengers side). Where a dedicated starter battery (ie dual Battery system) was added it was fitted to the RHS, as these XT Manual excerpts rather confusingly suggest:
a) The battery is located on the left hand side of the vehicle at the chassis level, refer to Fig. 1.
Note: Vehicles with a dual battery system have the second optional battery located in a similar position on the right hand side.
and
b) Dedicated Starting System
Description
The dedicated starting system comprises two batteries:
1. The standard battery on the L.H.S. of the vehicle known as the auxiliary battery.
2. The dedicated starting battery located on the R.H.S. of the vehicle.
That's why all the electrics operate from the "Auxiliary" (LHS) battery and only the starter function is relocated to the Starter (RHS) battery. It makes sense for the starter battery to be closest to the the starter motor. The key switch places the aux battery in parallel with the starter battery.
However it pays to check. When I got my Oka the wiring was the other way round so I rewired it this way on the back of the solenoid/switch.
I also fitted a Sterling AR12VD alternator regulator.
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David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

April 3, 2012 at 6:55 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Pete Fox
Member
Posts: 140
Whoops, the starter is on the drivers side. Blame the bottle of red for that one.
However the starting battery is on the passenger side. All current draw is from that battery including starting. The aux battery is only there as a redundant starting battery if the main battery is flat. In cooler weather I use the disconnect switch to bring it into the circuit to get the starter spinning a bit quicker. All electrics function normally with the aux battery removed.
Pete
--
Peter Fox

OKA 266 Multi-cab.

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April 3, 2012 at 7:49 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Rick Whitworth
Member
Posts: 74
On my previous 4WDs whenever I installed a large Auxiliary battery it was always dedicated to hungry "accessories", winch, driving lights, compressor, fridge, HF radio, live tow bar connection and other external connectors etc. The Auxiliary was charged last and flattening it had no effect on the standard battery. On one setup I also installed an overide key that would dedicate the Auxiliary back to the starter without the need to use jumper leads in the event that the Standard battery was dead .
OKAs do not work this way. #149 is wired same as XT manual as described by David with Dedicated Starting battery on drivers side and Standard battery on passenger side. Use of the name Auxilary battery in the manual to describe the Standard battery has always confused me.
I am still not sure what priority is given to the Dedicated Starting battery for recharging and how this relates to using the isolation key
Rick
April 3, 2012 at 9:17 AM Flag Quote & Reply

OKA in Africa
Member
Posts: 34
As far as I can see in the description and circuit diagram in the OKA operations manual the dual battery system charges both batteries simultaneously once the engine is starting.
There seems to be no individual regulator installed for the main and aux battery. However I realized that the batteries in my OKA are installed as the main on the RHS and aux on the LHS which is the other way around as described in the manual.

P.S.: I have now bought a Victron BMV 602S battery monitor which still needs to be installed. Anyone there who has recommendations how to run the cables for the monitor installation?

--
OKA 327 in Africa

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April 3, 2012 at 9:35 AM Flag Quote & Reply

oka422
Member
Posts: 7
On the OKA standard dual battery system, both batteries are automatically connected in parallel once the alternator starts producing power. This is done by a heavy duty relay relay in parallel with the isolation switch, which is energised by the "W" output (same as the tacho signal) of the alternator. So if the alternator fails, the starter motor battery should be isolated and all electrical power drawn from the AUX battery.
The "isolation switch" manually connects the batteries should one of the batteries be flat or has been removed.
Roger
April 3, 2012 at 9:51 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Just another bit of "useless" info.
Laid up with the main lead between the manual switch and the auxiliary battery on the passengers side is another lighter lead which feeds the fuse panel located on the left chassis rail. In this case, swapping the leads on the back of the switch would not entirely swap the battery functions around.

To avoid loading up the alternator with three batteries right from the start, my DC-DC charger has a manual switch fitted on the dash, along with a house battery volt and amp meter, so I can wait until the chassis batteries are fully charged before adding the house batteries to the load
--
Tony

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April 3, 2012 at 8:53 PM Flag Quote & Reply

T & D Morris
Member
Posts: 29
Hi
I have set mine up with driver’s side battery as the start battery as it is closer to the starter motor.
I have a deep cycle on the left and another under the left side bed.
I control them by a marine isolation switch behind the driver’s seat.
This way if I need all the power I can get for winching I can us all the batteries.
I have gotten into the habit of starting on the starting battery each morning and 15 minutes later changing the switch to the auxiliary, if we have stopped just over night I just start on the auxiliaries.
When I had it all installed and wanted the main wiring done I went to an auto electrician who had worked up north and he wired it up so the negative when to the marine switch.
He said the up north they found that a positive wire would rub on the chassis and drain the batteries but doing this way they can’t drain.
I have had this set up for around 12 years and have never had a problem.
I just don't trust solenoids and relays.
I had my dual fuel commodore in today for service because it sometimes stalled when changing over to gas, yep faulty relay.

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April 3, 2012 at 10:16 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Oka In Africa, re:
"P.S.: I have now bought a Victron BMV 602S battery monitor which still needs to be installed. Anyone there who has recommendations how to run the cables for the monitor installation?"
You've probably seen the usage and installation guides available here and here. With your batteries on either side of the Oka it will be tricky to monitor all of your power consumption since the ground (negative) leads from both batteries would need to be connected together, and then taken to the shunt, and then to ground/chassis.
You could monitor just the auxiliary battery which is where most of the power is coming and going from, since the starter battery is only used occasionally. If you did want to monitor your total battery power (the BMV602S allows this), you would need to replace the earth strap on your aux battery with a longer thick cable across to the shunt, which would need to be near the starter battery.
The most important part will be the installation of the shunt. It needs to be installed in series with the negative (ground) lead from the battery you are monitoring (ie the aux battery if you are only monitoring that, or the starter battery if you monitor all power, with a thick ground cable across from the aux battery negative, replacing its earth strap) using the same thick starter motor cable. Keep the shunt leads short and solid as possible all the starter current passes through it. The positive supply cable can be thinner as it just monitors the voltage.
Does that help?

--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

April 4, 2012 at 6:57 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Dean & Kaye Howells
Member
Posts: 79
The standard OKA dual battery setup differs from a conventional dual battery setup in that it has a dedicated start battery and a 'does everything else' battery. In a conventional dual battery setup you have a main does everything (including start) battery and an auxiliary battery (for fridge lighting etc). So it can be a bit misleading/confusing to refer to the OKA's battery setup as main/auxiliary. It is probably better to think of the OKA's standard dual battery configuration as a start/main battery setup.

It is probably the best design possible whilst keeping true to OKA's KISS principle and not resorting to electronics.The dedicated start battery concept may be inefficient in that it makes poor use of available battery capacity but great for peace of mind knowing that there is always a fully charged battery to start the vehicle. Battery coupling using a simple solenoid with a paralled manual switch is pretty foolproof and easy to diagnose/faultfind if neccessary. Having the coupling solenoid operate from the alternator 'pulse' output is brilliant in that it only allows battery coupling when the alternator is providing an output, ie. engine running at >900 rpm (approx). This avoids oops moments when the key is inadvertantly left in the ign. or aux. position and both batterys are flat. Issues about which battery charges first are irrelevant as the start battery is always fully charged. All in all a pretty good design.

However, the good design starts to become a bit unglued when winching commences.

Winching with the engine running at <900 rpm means the batterys are not coupled so only one battery is driving the winch, not a good idea. With the engine running at >900 rpm the batterys are joined together by the battery coupling solenoid (capacity<100 amps), not nearly enough to survive typical winching currents of 400-600 amps or more with nominally half the current supplied from each battery and via the solenoid contacts. Even with the manual battery coupling switch (capacity ~125 amps) thrown the whole setup is still pretty poor.

Another potential problem is that power is always connected to the winch . A fault with the winch electrics or tampering with the winch control could result in terrible damage.

On #413 I replaced the original battery coupling switch with a larger Narva unit. The Narva switch is dual pole (as opposed to the original OKA single pole switch) and is rated at 400 amps continuous for each set of contacts. Physically its about 100mm in diameter and 50mm deep. It just fits with a little bit of metal work on the existing plate behind the drivers seat. I connected the power lead from each battery to each of the two poles of the Narva switch and commoned the other (switched) ends together with a piece of brass plate which also connects to the power cable to the winch. This overcomes the two problems described above. With the (new) battery couple switch off there is no power to the winch and the batterys are not manually coupled. With the switch on both batterys are coupled with a capacity of 400 amps continuous through each set of contacts for a max of 800 amps safely available to the winch. It is not possible to winch with the batterys uncoupled.

I have also installed an auxiliary (third) battery as a dedicated freezer battery on #413. I fed this from the main battery via a relay activated from the OKA's auxiliary power circuit. This allows the aux. battery to charge when the engine is running but not to backfeed to the main battery when stopped or when starting regardless of the position of the battery couple switch.

So essentially #413 has three batteries. A dedicated start battery, a dedicated freezer battery and a does everything else battery. The start and main batterys are identical Optima spiral wound blue top AGM batterys and the freezer battery is 3X40 = 120 Ah conventional AGM batterys. The AGM batterys cost more than conventional flooded cell batterys but are cheaper in the long term for us as they don't fail due to vibration on rough outback roads.

Deano
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April 4, 2012 at 11:37 AM Flag Quote & Reply

OKA in Africa
Member
Posts: 34
Thanks for all the valuable and detailed input so far.
I will probably get back once I am going to install the unit.

Thanks
--
OKA 327 in Africa

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April 4, 2012 at 9:32 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Hal Harvey
Site Owner
Posts: 509
No wonder it's confusing. I found the article below in the factory's OKA News of September 1997; and it's also available as a pdf (to enlarge) in the Documents & Data pages here. It also refers to a different spec on earlier models to be discussed in a later issue... but if it ever was, I don't have the later issue.



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Hal

August 6, 2012 at 8:05 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Outback Jack
Member
Posts: 381
I think the system I have is just a switch between both batteries.
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August 6, 2012 at 8:58 PM Flag Quote & Reply

David Hallandal
Member
Posts: 133
RE: Auxiliary battery it was always dedicated to hungry "accessories", winch, driving lights, compressor, fridge, HF radio, live tow bar connection and other external connectors etc.
A HF Radio and Winch should always be conected to the Starting Battery. With the HF Radio you need it connected to the battery with the most grunt and after camping with a fridge running along with other power hungry accessories and find you need to make an Emergency Call then the starting battery is the isolated battery with the most power left to run the radio. Like wise a Winch will be on a Battery what is being charged from the alternator direct when you need to use it and not through a isolator
The Starting battery is on the Drivers Side. However the OKA will not start if the Auxiliary battery is flat as there is a feed to the instrument panel from this Battery
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David Hallandal
OKA-131 Home Page
OKA Camper Trailer
XT and LT Service Manuals on CD For Sale
20mm Spring Hanger Upgrade Kits For Sale

August 7, 2012 at 8:05 AM
  • dandjcr
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30 Oct 2012 13:01
dandjcr created the topic:Differential pinion seal

Differential pinion seal

Category: October 2012

Forum Home > OKA Maintenance > Differential pinion seal


Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Seal is CR 18888

Anyone have the number of the speedy sleeve to match
--
Tony

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September 25, 2012 at 7:27 PM Flag Quote & Reply

joseph baz
Member
Posts: 331
What series yoke you have on yours? is still the XT std?
Cheers,Joe
September 25, 2012 at 8:13 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Outback Jack
Member
Posts: 381
Is there any upgrades you can do to the yokes?

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September 25, 2012 at 8:57 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Far as I know my XT 123 is stock standard (if there is such a thing)

Don't need the seal and sleeve, just want to top up my spares just in case.
--
Tony

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September 25, 2012 at 11:25 PM Flag Quote & Reply

joseph baz
Member
Posts: 331
Outback Jack at September 25, 2012 at 8:57 PM
Is there any upgrades you can do to the yokes?

Yes ,there is but you will have to upgrade the yoke in the tail shaft end as well as the unis are bigger.
Tony,I think I have a couple of sleeves at the workshop,will let you know the number this afternoon.
Cheers,Joe
September 26, 2012 at 8:04 AM Flag Quote & Reply

outyonda.com
Member
Posts: 58
you can drill & fit u bolts. same u/j same u bolt all round. cheers Brett
September 26, 2012 at 8:22 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Pete Fox
Member
Posts: 140
Tony Lee at September 25, 2012 at 7:27 PM
Seal is CR 18888

Anyone have the number of the speedy sleeve to match
CR 18888 is not the correct seal although it will fit. The ID and OD are the same, but the profile of the metal stamping is different.
The correct seal is National 9316. The shape of the metal stamping, fits in behind the dust shield on the uni yoke so that the seal lip is protected. with the CR 18888, the lip is exposed.

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Peter Fox

OKA 266 Multi-cab.

Photobucket album



September 26, 2012 at 8:29 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Outback Jack
Member
Posts: 381
I am also lead to believe that you can put them in backwards. They will seal for a while, but not last that long.
I am still confused about yokes etc. I thought all OKA`s came out with 1410 Uni`s. Maybe a few early ones didnt. I also know that some have the straps for the Uni and others U bolts.
Will have to check 169, I think it has a combination of both.
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September 26, 2012 at 9:04 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Chalkie
Member
Posts: 21
Just got two N9316 seals for mine. is there any precations to be taken when removing and fitting?
September 26, 2012 at 1:25 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
"The shape of the metal stamping, fits in behind the dust shield on the uni yoke so that the seal lip is protected. with the CR 18888, the lip is exposed."
Tried to get that dust shield a couple of years ago (ftransfer case front output has one) but told they were no longer available. Seemed to me that they served a very useful function and couldn't understand the non-availability
--
Tony

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September 26, 2012 at 2:18 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539

CR 18888 is not the correct seal although it will fit. The ID and OD are the same, but the profile of the metal stamping is different.
The correct seal is National 9316."

This could be corrected in the spare parts listing which has shown the 18888 seal for several years
--
Tony

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September 26, 2012 at 2:29 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Ah, OK - just went and checked what the bearing place gave me. They took a while to find a reference to the CR18888 anyway, and I see they have supplied the National 9316.

Sleeve they gave me was National 99187.

Now, one of those dust shields would be nice.

This seal looks different to the one I was supplied a couple of years ago. Does the actual lip part of the seal (the smallest diameter part) face into the diff or towards the yolk. If it faced the yolk, looks as if the seal would be harder to fit.

"Will have to check 169, I think it has a combination of both."

123 has both - straps on diff end and ubolts on transfer case end
--
Tony

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September 26, 2012 at 2:35 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Pete Fox
Member
Posts: 140
Tony
the spring always goes towards the oil.
These pictures should show the difference
This is 266's rear pinion with a National 9316 fitted, notice that none of the pinion shaft is visible the shield on the yoke fits over the seal



This is 266's front pinion with a CR 18888 fitted. Shaft and seal lip is visible and the shield on the yoke is doing nothing.



A new yoke showing the shield. All Dana 60 and 70 diffs have the same yoke/ seal/ pinion nut and they should have this shield



--
Peter Fox

OKA 266 Multi-cab.

Photobucket album



September 26, 2012 at 4:07 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Pete Fox
Member
Posts: 140
Chalkie at September 26, 2012 at 1:25 PM
Just got two N9316 seals for mine. is there any precations to be taken when removing and fitting?
Chalkie
you will destroy the old seal getting it out, they are very tight.
There are probalbly better ways, but a block of 4x2 hardwood across the face of the seal with a decent hammer seems to work.
Also the pinion nuts can be almost impossible to shift. I have just done this job and I drilled the nut parallel with the thread and split it with a cold chisel. the nuts are fairly soft and a new 3mm drill did it easy. you will know when you are through the nut because there is a hardended washer behind it that is tough to drill. New nuts are available on eBay for about $10 each plus about $10 for freight for two.
--
Peter Fox

OKA 266 Multi-cab.

Photobucket album



September 26, 2012 at 4:32 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Thank to your photos Peter, I can see it was much ado about nothing because I did get it right when I put a new seal in after the first Simpson trip.
What I didn't get right though was the seal had that red paint which should have acted to seal the outer of the seal against the recess in the diff housing so I didn't put any extra sealant on it. Seal wasn't perfect and getting a weep past the outside of the seal. No real harm, just adds to the mess a little. I did clean the area with CRC CO (thanks Peter & Sandra) and smeared some red silicone around the perimeter and it did stop it for all of the recent trip until recently.

I made up a tool to lock the yoke solidly while undoing the nut, Just a bit of angle with a V cut out to clear the nut and a couple of holes to bolt it to the end of the yoke. Length of angle is long enough to hit the ground or the chassis. Otherwise there is too much spring in the transmission to get the nut loose unless you use an impact wrench
Nut is 1 5/16" AF
--
Tony

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September 26, 2012 at 4:58 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Chalkie
Member
Posts: 21
Looks like it could keep me busy for a while.
September 26, 2012 at 6:04 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
Not a big job really.
Unbolt the universal joint an move tail shaft out of the way. Make sure the caps don't fall off (can check for broken rollers, lubrication etc while they are accessible
Mark the exact position of the nut so you can get it back to exactly the same position rather than using torque settings because I understand they are only good for the first time you set it up.
If you have a big pipe wrench you could put it on the yoke with the handle against the ground or the chassis to stop it turning when you undo the nut - or make up a tool like I did.
Washer under the nut
Pull the yoke out

Dig the seal out. Can't remember if there are shims plus the washer behind it but make sure they are undisturbed or put back the same way.
Washer and bearing behind the seal

Clean up inside and where the seal goes
Check condition of bearing and outer
Preoil the bearing if you need to
Use something like the red silicone to coat the outer rim of the seal
Bash it in
Refit the yoke and do up the nut to exactly the same position. Use new nut if the nyloc bit isn't working properly
Refit the universal joint/tail shaft
Grease the tail shaft

--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 26, 2012 at 7:21 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
When you have the yoke out it's a good idea to get it modified to use U-bolts rather than the original straps and small bolts which can work loose or are difficult to remove.



The same applies to the transfer box front yoke. Paul Nott can do this mod and supply the U-bolts.
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

September 27, 2012 at 7:21 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Outback Jack
Member
Posts: 381
I thought it was just a matter of drilling the threads out in the yoke?
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Outback Jack
Member
Posts: 381
Oh OK.
Once 169 is back together, I might look at changing the yokes out, they are fairly cheap from the States.

--


September 27, 2012 at 9:23 AM Flag Quote & Reply

joseph baz
Member
Posts: 331
Tony Lee at September 25, 2012 at 7:27 PM
Seal is CR 18888

Anyone have the number of the speedy sleeve to match
Sorry Tony,forgot about it yesterday,the SKF part no is 99832,that sleeve will fit over the yoke with the diam 1.875" which is the 1350 series
Cheers,Joe
September 27, 2012 at 6:58 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Tony Lee
Member
Posts: 539
joseph baz at September 27, 2012 at 6:58 PM
Tony Lee at September 25, 2012 at 7:27 PM
Seal is CR 18888

Anyone have the number of the speedy sleeve to match
Sorry Tony,forgot about it yesterday,the SKF part no is 99832,that sleeve will fit over the yoke with the diam 1.875" which is the 1350 series
Cheers,Joe
Damn and blast. They gave me sleeve National 99187. so I guess I might have to find my calipers and check - but of course I can't measure the yoke in-situ so

And one sleeve costs as much as 2 seals
Ah OK when in doubt use the internet

Well I'll be. dimensions are identical with one being referred to as a "gold product"

Doh!
--
Tony

picasaweb.google.com/114611728110254134379

September 27, 2012 at 8:19 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alister McBride
Member
Posts: 97
On the note of removing the pinion nut. It's hard to remove for three possible reasons, one it's usually rattle gunned on, two usually loctite is used which is the bigger influence, and three it's possibly rusted on a bit. I used the oxy just to heat up the nut A LITTLE BIT (which releases the loctite, don't heat up enough to melt seals etc!) then it just came loose...

Jo, on the note of 1350 uni's v's 1410, am i right in assuming from what you guys are talking about that the front driveshaft at some stage in OKA history got upgraded to 1410 series? The reason i ask is that i'm building a Dana 70 front diff and Dana 80 rear which means i probably need to shorten the driveshafts. Currently i have 1350 front uni's which need replacing anyway, I am going to be using the 325 Michies so i'm assuming it would be wise to upgrade to 1410 on the front as the 'fuse' will be a little too small otherwise...? Although i can't really find torque specs on the web for the 1410 v's 1350...
September 28, 2012 at 10:49 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Outback Jack
Member
Posts: 381
I know 244 had the 1410 Uni`s, but not sure on 169.
I dont know how to tell the difference really,
Here is a picture of the Rear Diff Uni



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September 28, 2012 at 11:26 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Alister McBride
Member
Posts: 97
Thanks Outback Jack, the standard rear uni is a 1410 but its the front i'm interested in. Sounds like they started with 1350's and later went to 1410's, can someone confirm?
Cheers,
Alister
September 28, 2012 at 5:38 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Outback Jack
Member
Posts: 381
OK, I think it was the real early ones, But wiser ones here will tell you.
I have to do the rear pinion seal, I will have to check what I have. But I used the Dana Part number at CBC and the crossed referenced it
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September 28, 2012 at 6:53 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alister McBride
Member
Posts: 97
Any wiser one's out there?
September 30, 2012 at 12:59 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Pete Fox
Member
Posts: 140
Alister
the XT parts book shows the complete 1410 series prop shaft as superceding a previously existing 1350 series shaft, but no mention of which serial no's the 1350's were fitted to. It also show lists the yokes to be used in the changeover.
There is no direct listing of the 1350 series UJ as a separate part for the XT so I would read into that, that the Okas fitted with 1350 unis were upgraded by Oka (or were supposed to be).
The 1350 series is a narrower UJ than the 1410 but uses the same size cap
1350= 3 5/8" width 1 3/16" cap
1410= 4 3/16" width 1 3/16" cap
whatever that is in metric.


--
Peter Fox

OKA 266 Multi-cab.

Photobucket album



September 30, 2012 at 1:52 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Outback Jack
Member
Posts: 381
Conversions listed here
engvalves.com/itemfiles/ctbvp46.pdf


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September 30, 2012 at 2:10 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Alister McBride
Member
Posts: 97
Thanks Peter. Yeah, i wouldn't have thought the 1350 would be up to the torque requirements in an OKA aspecially with soon to be big tyres! So it sounds like i'll be chasing OKA up to upgrade my driveshaft... doh! It's pretty costly too (my uni's are gone so need to renew anyway). Got quotes from spicer near Dandenong (melbourne) and it was a massive expense for new driveshafts! Anybody found a good supplier in Vic that can rebuild or make newbies?
Cheers,
Alister
September 30, 2012 at 8:19 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Pete Fox
Member
Posts: 140
Alister
it would be much cheaper to import the parts from USA. For example the NP205 output flange and the Dana input flange are about $80 each in the USA see here and here. You will need to find out the correct number of splines on the rear of the NP205. All Dana 60 and 70 pinion shafts are the same.
You can figure out which parts you need by using the Hardy Spicer catalogue and your rear tailshaft ( the front prop shaft parts will you need be the same as in your rear shaft). Depending on where you are it shouldn't be too hard to to find someone to make it up for you. Once you find out the correct part numbers, just google them and you will get heaps of hits.
All roads seem to lead to Northern Drivetrain though and it may be just as easy to type the part number into the serach box there. You can even get your drivshaft tube from here. I think they may make it up for you.
--
Peter Fox

OKA 266 Multi-cab.

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October 1, 2012 at 5:30 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Pete Fox
Member
Posts: 140
Alister
the major difference between the 1350's and 1410's is not their strength, but their operating angle. Unless you plan to get radical, you may not need to upgrade

The continuous rating of a 1350 is 210 lb-ft and the 1410 is 250 lb-ft, this is about a 20% difference.
the max operating angle is 20deg (1350) compared to 37deg (1410)

There is a good article on all this stuff from Billa Vista

--
Peter Fox

OKA 266 Multi-cab.

Photobucket album



October 1, 2012 at 7:06 AM Flag Quote & Reply

joseph baz
Member
Posts: 331
If you are re tubing,may as well go for 1480 series and that will make it uniform throughout the vehicle,like front axles and prop shafts and only need 1 spare universal joint.
Cheers,Joe
October 1, 2012 at 9:20 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Alister McBride
Member
Posts: 97
Thanks Guys! I'll let you know how i go...
October 3, 2012 at 10:07 AM
September 27, 2012 at 7:32 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Dandj
Member
Posts: 367
Outback Jack at September 27, 2012 at 7:32 AM
I thought it was just a matter of drilling the threads out in the yoke?
Jack, no the pitch of the U-bolts is different (wider) than the straps. You really need a jig to ensure the correct spacing while drilling.
--
David and Janet Ribbans, Oka 148

September 27, 2012 at 9:17 AM
  • dandjcr
  • dandjcr's Avatar
30 Oct 2012 12:57 - 14 Aug 2013 20:50
dandjcr created the topic:Front side indicator lights

Front side indicator lights

Category: September 2012

from Hal Harvey:
Early on in our OKA ownership, I drove down a narrow bush track and smashed a side indicator light off. They're small on LTs and XTs, and stick out a bit. I duly replaced it, and soon smashed another one off. Evidently they're alright on minesites and gravel roads. Not so good on narrow overgrown tracks.
Repeating this exercise would have annoyed me, so I removed the sticky-out indicators and covered the holes with reflective patches that look like they were meant to be there. That has sufficed for 14 years, but they're probably not satisfying some ADR requirement, and for good reason; if I change lanes in on to somebody already alongside me, they don't have an indicator flashing at them to warn them. This actually happened a few months back, and is the first time I've seen the lack of an indicator there cause a problem; merging two lanes into one coming to a booze bus, and the guy a bit back and to my left - but not far enough back to see the rear light - got very narky, even though we were going walking pace and he had an emergency lane to his left; which he used to screech around me before having to slam on the brakes for the cops. All a bit messy.
So I'd like to replace the front side indicator lights with ones that work, and don't get smashed off on the first branch or any subsequent ones. NTs have a big and robust-looking unit plonked on the door panel, but I don't know if they're any better in the bush, and I think I'd rather have something less protruding.
My question is: does anybody have a better way to do this? Something that's hard to smash - meets ADRs - that's about it, really.
Early models had the indicator horizontal, up to about #200:



Then for the rest of the XTs and all of the LTs, it was a vertical indicator that often ended up looking like this:



... which I sort of overcame by doing this:



NTs have this:



September 27, 2012

from Pete Fox:
Hal
On 266 the previous owner must have had the same problem as 266 spent its life on narrow bush tracks.
He moved the indicator lights just forward onto the angled panel that the radio aerial is mounted on - here they are protected by the bullbar and are still vivible from the rear. They have been mounted horizontally.



The lights look like they have been there a while so I guess it works.
September 28, 2012

from outyonda.com:
Hal, I make a little panel out of alloy checker plate to cover the rust & indent the flicker into the RHS. cheers Brett
September 28, 2012

from Tony Lee:
123 has the horizontal indicator light and if it didn't get knocked off coming up the Canning stock route, I don't see how it could ever get hit - but of course it only needs one stick poking out at the right angle.
Could fit a bit of contoured channel on the body and then mount the light within the sides of the channel so that anything other than a horizontal stick just slides out and over it.
Need to check the ADRs for compliance with visibility angles.
September 28, 2012

from Outback Jack:
Some options here,
rvadenver.com/lights_&_lenses.htm
Bargman #68 doesnt look much bigger than what you have.
However I think you need to have one that can be seen from the rear.
I think early NTs had the lights on the coffin panels? Below is a NT coffin panel.



Also Hella make a clearance light with a metal shroud on the top and bottom.
September 28, 2012

from Hal Harvey:
That last one doesn't look like a bad idea. I think I'll end up with air intakes both sides so maybe I could have them up under the intakes, where they would cop less... but I'll see if I can find the relevant ADR first. Would take a bit more re-wiring than having them on the front panel, but might be worth it.
September 28, 2012

from Outback Jack:
The wiring would be easy enough, just run the wire back from where the fronts go, along the chassis.
I think with the NT, the ADRs may have changed a few times.
Those panels were supplied direct from OKA.
September 28, 2012

from Tony Lee:
www.rta.nsw.gov.au/registration/download...ehicles_nov_2007.pdf
Side repeater lights have to be visible from 5 degrees out from straight behind to 60 degrees so that would preclude any lamp that was on that sloped panels at the front and didn't have part of the lens poking out sideways beyond the line of the body.
September 28, 2012

from Pete Fox:
I checked the setup on 266 against the RTA specs and it is legal.
The lights can be seen from about 400mm outside the back of the body which equates to 5 deg and right out past 90 deg.
September 30, 2012 at 2:34 PM
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